Get Busy Living.®


Get Busy Living$33.95

This manual is designed to help you progress through your program. You will find it helpful if you use it honestly and openly. 88 pages Spiral bound. The table of contents will offer you an idea of what is included in the text.



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2009 Summary of the Annual Report for 2008 Published by ING Counseling.


Sex Crimes:
Predictable, Preventable, & Treatable

A guide to understanding sex offenders living in Northern Nevada

2009 Policy Summary of the
Annual Report for 2008
by: Ing Consulting, Inc.

This is the 2009 summary of the 2008 annual report relating to the treatment of sex offenders in Northern Nevada during the past eight years, with specific applicability to calendar year 2008.

Of the 353 individuals referred to the program over the last eight years, a total of six have been rearrested for a sex offense. Some were rearrested after only weeks in the program, one of the most heinous and notorious in northern Nevada, Curtis Lange, reoffended after five years in the program by committing two violent sexual assaults.

How do these statistics for northern Nevada compare to national numbers? A study conducted by the Justice Department of 9,691 men who were released in 1994 and followed up over a three year period indicated that the sex offenders in that study were rearrested for another sex crime after their release at a rate of 5.3%. The study is available on their Website (www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/crimoff.htm#recidivism)

Nationally, criminals who are not sex offenders were rearrested for sex crimes at a rate of 1.3 percent. This compares to an eight-year span in which sex offenders in our program relapsed at a rate of 1.69%—less than half of the national average—over nearly triple the amount of time. Nevada was not one of the 15 states in the Justice Department Study.

Policy Implications
Remembering that these statistics on sex offender recidivism are the best available in our state (because they are the only statistics available), we can draw the following conclusion: what we are already doing with sex offenders is working very well. This conclusion is counterintuitive to the sensationalizing of the issue by pundits and politicians who lean toward fear as a motivator to gain votes at the expense of community hysteria.

After looking at how well one program is doing in one metro area of our state, the following observations are irrefutable:
Of the next 100 (or 1000) sex offenses in Nevada any of us read about in the media virtually all will be committed by first time offenders. After all, there were only six re-offenders in northern Nevada over eight years during which hundreds of other offenses were committed by first time offenders; the sad case of Brianna Dennison in Reno illustrates this.

Additional laws regarding sex offender supervision (including GPS) would be counterproductive and overly expensive; in effect, bolting a barn door after the horses have escaped. The 2007 Halloween burning of the Mizpah Hotel in Reno (killing a dozen people) is an example of our need to more effectively allocate law enforcement resources.

Proactive leaders who are serious about preventing future victimization must pursue prevention strategies rather than focusing on punishing offenders from the past.

Supervision of offenders in at least part of Nevada is already among the best in the nation. The next step is community-wide action by proactive leadership with an emphasis on prevention which will do far more to reduce sexual criminality than any other course of action.

So long as our policy focuses on punishing offenders of the past rather than preventing sex crimes (and preventing future victimization) no civic leader can meaningfully say he or she cares about victims. Only action, not reaction, can prevent sex crimes.

For those who are interested in community-based prevention strategies the full report is available at cost upon request.


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